winters fruit tree eggs

are unique because of the way our hens are raised. Our hens have been producing their own chicks for the last 35 years. Read more about our flock below. 

Some of our roosters and hens are completely and truly free-range, meaning they sleep and nest on the fruit trees at night. This gives them protection from critters such as Raccoons. They also have no supplemental feeding and rely solely on what they find in their environment such as bugs, grass and discarded produce that falls from the trees. They also help with pest management, fertilize the ground and are useful in keeping our fruit trees healthy. 

Q: wHY ARE YOUR EGGS SMALL?

Our hens are a mixed flock. They are not purebred hens and are a mixture of bantam and standard hens. A few roosters and hens were previously dumped on the property which also mixed the population. Purebred poultry are bred to produce large eggs. We do not believe that a large egg makes a good egg.  

  Q: Where do you get your hens?   Our hens get to raise their own chicks unlike most modern farms, where chicks are bought from hatcheries. Our hens raise their chicks until they no longer want to care for them which varies from hen to hen. Most hatcheries discard male chicks as roosters are not needed for egg production. Our hens are traditional in the sense that they raise their own chicks. While this leads to more time labor and is not considered "efficient" for egg production, we believe it can be efficient to let hens raise there own chicks and not buy from hatcheries.    Q: What happens to your hens when they get older?   We do not cull our hens. Our hens die from old age or illness. Most modern poultry farmers cull their hens after several years as they no longer become efficient layers.. Hens will continue to lay eggs throughout their lives although their production does decrease with age. We do not use heat lamps which can also decline a hens age and laying lifespan as it forces them to lay during the cold months. By not using heat lamps and essentially giving them a "vacation" their laying lifespan lasts a lot longer.    Q: What do you do with your roosters?   Some of our Roosters do die from old age. However when there are too many roosters in a flock this can cause a lot of aggressive behavior. We do not cull our own roosters but when we do have an abundant amount, we sell them to several local families who cull them themselves. We believe that the best way to eat meat is to cull the animal yourself as there is a direct connection to the live food source.

Q: Where do you get your hens?

Our hens get to raise their own chicks unlike most modern farms, where chicks are bought from hatcheries. Our hens raise their chicks until they no longer want to care for them which varies from hen to hen. Most hatcheries discard male chicks as roosters are not needed for egg production. Our hens are traditional in the sense that they raise their own chicks. While this leads to more time labor and is not considered "efficient" for egg production, we believe it can be efficient to let hens raise there own chicks and not buy from hatcheries. 

Q: What happens to your hens when they get older?

We do not cull our hens. Our hens die from old age or illness. Most modern poultry farmers cull their hens after several years as they no longer become efficient layers.. Hens will continue to lay eggs throughout their lives although their production does decrease with age. We do not use heat lamps which can also decline a hens age and laying lifespan as it forces them to lay during the cold months. By not using heat lamps and essentially giving them a "vacation" their laying lifespan lasts a lot longer. 

Q: What do you do with your roosters?

Some of our Roosters do die from old age. However when there are too many roosters in a flock this can cause a lot of aggressive behavior. We do not cull our own roosters but when we do have an abundant amount, we sell them to several local families who cull them themselves. We believe that the best way to eat meat is to cull the animal yourself as there is a direct connection to the live food source.

Q: What do your hens eat?

Our outdoor hens and roosters do not get any supplemental feeding besides the occasional scratch. We do coop some of our hens in free range pens in order to control the population. Our cooped hens receive a combination of commercial food, grass/alfalfa and all the veggies and fruits that are not sold in the fruit stand. Most of what we do not sell at the fruit stand goes to our hens (this also helps prevent food waste). They have the ability to eat all the bugs they want and have outdoor access. 

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